The Hearing Ally Blog

Hearing loss, the extremely common, yet invisible birth defect*. It can masquerade as a learning disability or attention problem if left unaddressed.

Hearing loss, the extremely common, yet invisible birth defect*. It can masquerade as a learning disability or attention problem if left unaddressed.

When we talk about children with a hearing impairment raised in a hearing and speaking environment, the negative impact of leaving it untreated is very well documented. Because speech and language development have critical windows in early life, hearing loss can significantly impact this development. This is true even when it is mild or only in one ear! Even common (though not at birth) and seemingly benign things like ear infections can cause mild (or greater) conductive hearing loss and impact development.

We know from years of identifying children with hearing loss after there are signs of speech and language delays that delayed intervention can be extremely costly. Turns out it is much cheaper for the government to identify and intervene with children with hearing loss as early as possible, rather than wait. 

Read on!

Why many physicians are in the dark about treating tinnitus.

tinnitus education

Chances are your healthcare providers know very little about tinnitus, its causes, or how to treat it.

Even if they went to a prestigious school or work hard to stay up to date on new treatments. Why? Well, in part because researchers don’t claim to know that much about tinnitus. But we know a lot more today than ever before and there are many evidence based treatments available. Unfortunately, despite the fact tinnitus effects 15% of the population, most medical schools aren’t teaching enough about the ear/brain system. And, what they do teach, is usually out of date.

 

Read on!

Your patients are missing your best advice: My Top 5 Tips on How to Be Heard for Healthcare Providers

communication strategies hearing loss Isn’t it strange how patients sometimes just “hear what they want to hear.” For example, you are positive you didn’t say “I love WebMD, go ahead and read that instead of asking me for advice.” Yet somehow, that is the primary piece of information they left your office with. They are truly missing some of your best advice. Today I’m going to give you my Top 5 Tips on How To Be Heard for healthcare providers

Read on!

Get Your Hearing Loss Quick Check!

A simple checklist to identify hearing loss red flags for you or someone else - including high risk factors and questions that uncover hidden hearing loss.

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About Me

My name is Dr. Alexandra deGroot. I am an Audiologist and hearing health educator to physicians and families. I’m passionate about making this information accessible to all health care fields (no matter the age of its patients). Read more here »

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